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A wonderful resource for cancer patients and care givers

posted 7 May 2015, 10:08 by Tim Elliston   [ updated 13 May 2015, 10:30 ]

By Craig Ruvere

Up until recently, the only thing I knew about Jeannine Walston was her mother – whom I had the great pleasure of working with for the better part of a year.


I’m happy to say that we’ve stayed in contact since my departure from the organization we shared in common, and that’s how I eventually came to learn about her daughter Jeannine and her incredible cancer journey.


Mary Lou Kownacki once said that, “There isn’t anyone you couldn’t love once you’ve heard their story.”


Isn’t it true that far too often our relationships are very superficial? We exchange pleasantries, but otherwise we shield ourselves from having to console or advise others on the struggles they deal with personally.


Many times it’s those unheard stories which help us re-evaluate our own priorities in life – even inspire us to inspire others. Visiting Jeannine’s site and reading her motivational articles has certainly caused me to examine my own pathways – detouring from a self-defeatist attitude that sometimes plagues my existence.


Many of us tend to believe that our lives are the only ones burdened with the trials and tribulations of life. Some of us are so caught up in a world of materials and social popularity that we forget about what’s truly important, and how grateful we should be every morning we’re able to start a new day with few obstructions.


Jeannine’s highly informative website (jeanninewalston.com) simply says, “Healing Cancer – Information and inspiration to support your optimal health and healing.”


Along with her cancer story, Jeannine’s articles on integrative cancer care explain improvements for quality of life, cancer survival and cancer prevention. Her site even has sections about integrative cancer care for the whole person in body, mind, spirit, social and environmental health – plus cancer treatment navigation and support to help cancer patients and cancer caregivers as they journey down this path.


Every article is woven together with Jeannine’s own scars in an effort to connect with and assist others.


She began her cancer journey when she was just 24 years old, and it was discovered that she had a brain tumor in her left temporal lobe – the part of the brain that controls speech, memory and sound.


From her website: “When my cancer journey began in 1998, fear of my own mortality rattled me to my bones. Now over fourteen years later, I’ve navigated through two awake brain surgeries with a recurrence, over 40 MRI scans, hundreds of integrative cancer therapies, other modalities, introspection, study, and resources to improve my quality of life and cancer survival. Through my course, I’ve learned to find quality information and a commitment to personal transformation. Along with tremendous knowledge, my mosaic of wisdom includes how I embrace adversity as opportunity, life as a spiritual journey, and illness with or without cancer as a vehicle for the soul’s evolution.”


Jeannine’s words are truly inspiring in a world which seems so overcome with negativity and despair. The sad reality is that many of us will come to know someone battling cancer – maybe it’s a friend, a loved one or maybe even yourself.


But the battle doesn’t have to be fought alone. Jeannine’s bravery comes through in her words and her commitment to guide you through this unfortunate storm – sharing her knowledge, resources and hope. Her professional work, research and personal experiences have given her expertise to help cancer patients and cancer caregivers in the journey for health and healing.


She also offers invaluable services, such as Cancer Coaching, for one-on-one support to coach and guide those in need.


I urge you all take a moment to visit her site – maybe you even know someone right now who could benefit from her inspiration, support and guidance.


Helen Keller once said that “Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.” We should all be grateful that there are inspiring survivors in this world who have made it their mission to help people do just that.


Craig Ruvere

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